Home

Events

Friday, 16 August 2024
  • 1650-1850: Ideas, Aesthetics, and Inquiries in the Early Modern Era (Volume 29), edited by Kevin L. Cope

    Friday, 16 August 2024

    Exploratory, investigative, and energetically analytical, 16501850 covers the full expanse of long eighteenth-century thought, writing, and art while delivering abundant revelatory detail. Essays on well-known cultural figures combine with studies of emerging topics to unveil a vivid rendering of a dynamic period, simultaneously committed to singular genius and universal improvement. Read more.

  • The Essential Poetry of Bohdan Ihor Antonych: Ecstasies and Elegies, translated by Michael M. Naydan

    Friday, 16 August 2024

    Lemko-Ukrainian poet Bohdan Ihor Antonych (1909-37) is not as well-known as such great Slavic Modernist poets as Mandelstam, Pasternak, and Milosz, or their Western European counterparts Eliot, Rilke, and Lorca, but in the opinion of many literary critics he unquestionably should be. Sometimes compared to Walt Whitman and to Dylan Thomas, Antonych, who described himself as “an ecstatic pagan, a poet of the high of spring,” created during his brief lifetime powerful and innovative poetry with astonishing metaphorical constructions. Read more.

Friday, 13 September 2024
  • The Joyce of Everyday Life, by Vicki Mahaffey

    Friday, 13 September 2024

    Part of James Joyce’s genius was his ability to find the poetry in everyday life. For Joyce, even a simple object like a table becomes magical, “a board that was of the birchwood of Finlandy and it was upheld by four dwarfmen of that country but they durst not move more for enchantment.” How might we learn to regain some of the child-like play with language and sense of delight in the ordinary that comes so naturally to Joyce? Read more.

Friday, 11 October 2024
  • Biomythography Bayou, by Mel Michelle Lewis

    Friday, 11 October 2024

    When your stories flow from the brackish waters of the Gulf South, where the land and water merge, your narratives cannot be contained or constrained by the Eurocentric conventions of autobiography. When your story is rooted in the histories of your West African, Creek, and Creole ancestors, as well as your Black, feminist, and queer communities, you must create a biomythography that transcends linear time and extends beyond the pages of a book. Read more.